Effective Management killers – 7 habits of highly ineffective managers

ineffective-managerWhat are two things you will find every where till the time you are alive? The answer: Oxygen and Managers! (tweet this)

Jokes apart; Management is the most misunderstood word in the history of business. While some treat it just a job profile, others treat it as a way to run away from actual work. A teams understanding of what a manager does is weirder than you can imagine.

I myself manage a good team of resources as part of my daily activities. What I have learnt serving managers, being manager and watching managers is that, as time passes by some of us collate certain habits which end up leading us to ineffective management styles.

These habits, in most of the cases are not permanent behaviors but occasional stances that we take. So I thought it would be great if I can share my experience with the existing and the future management community out here.

Do note this does not resemble to any specific person. But are occasional mistakes that all of us do (including me!) and these need to be nipped in the bud before it becomes a habit. Cutting things short following are the

7 Habits of highly ineffective managers.

  1. Delegate and Delegate whatever possible. – Delegation is one of the worst used tools in Management. While we were taught that we need to get work done from our teams, the ineffective ones thought they never need to work on anything. This type of managers simply delegates whatever can be given to a junior.  To save yourself from this syndrome, remember to delegate tasks which are supposed to be done by the delegate. Also the one receiving the work should concur with the scope and other specifics of the task. Delegation is not to dump your job on others; it is to distribute tasks in a way so that you can concentrate on the crucial ones.
  2. Criticize in public, the harder you criticize the more professional you are. – I don’t know why but we have an innate obsession for criticizing others. When we are upset with some one we blow it out till the time we feel good. Now how big was the mistake? It doesn’t matter. We just don’t seem to miss this opportunity of criticizing. For help on this, remember the golden rule of criticism – Criticize privately and appreciate publicly.
  3. Feedback sharing is an annual process – These are the ones who least bother about providing you right and timely feedback. As per them feedback sharing time means your appraisal period and that’s when they are supposed to crib about how bad you have been. The reason a race is lost might not have anything to do with the speed of the vehicle; it might be the direction which leads to the problem. Remember a timely feedback can give the right direction, can save you days in effort and tons in rapport with your subordinates.
  4. Whatever is done should be credited to me – Also known as the credit suckers, these are the group of people who immediately pounce in any meeting to grab the credit of anything done. Credit takers are everywhere, from the office peon to the Leaders of the nation; but the immediate manager is the one who can’t be stopped from doing so. We all know that most of the things we do is a team effort yet we all end up praising the one or two rock stars and never realize how the others did. At times a sweet word of appreciation and crediting the right guy is much more than a hefty paycheck. Try it, it might work wonders for you.
  5. Happy team mates mean something wrong with your management – This is a bit controversial one. My style of managing people involves super engagement. But often I have been personally suggested to keep distance from my team in many scenarios. I guess this type of management style believes that a leader/manager is the super silent and serious guy sitting at the top. He is available only on request. He cant read between the lines and understand expressions, all he understands is written and official plea. Is that really how we can get work done in the long run?
  6. Be super unclear – Whether it’s about assigning you tasks to do or discussing what solutions are to be provided, these managers are the ones who are super unclear about what they are supposed to do. The major frustration arrives when they are unclear about what they want from you. Your goals and KPIs are always unclear. You slog for certain things for a year long only to realize that this was not what was expected from you. Clarity is a byproduct of constant and realistic engagement (tweet this). If you are engaged with the team and clear about what is to be done, rock star performers will be invented every moment.
  7. I am the Boss – Yes this is what I have learnt till date. If you manage a team you are a manager. Look out what the progress is and ensure the project goes well, you are a supervisor. The words manager, supervisor and guide are still subtle, but Boss is the Boss. It some how boosts you ego to think that there are 5 other intellectuals who will listen to any random order you place and say Yes Sir. Boss is so 1950s, you still can be a supervisor. But the best of them all is an Engager. If you think you are the boss, and you can do anything, well there’s so much more in life that you need to learn.

So here it is. Some obvious, some weird and some personal thoughts all merged into one post to highlight the most ineffective management styles for you. Now over to you. Can you identify some of these in you? It’s never late to take a feedback, better rectify before any one tags you as an ineffective manager.

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{ 2 comments }

Mike Anderson September 10, 2010 at 5:54 pm

Very good observation. These are great points that I have written about on my career advice site was well.

A concept called the Peter Principle suggests that everyone will in time be promoted to their highest leve,l of incompetence. Unfortunately for the workforce, all too often that is the definition of their manager.

Well done!!

Mike

mohini sharma December 20, 2010 at 8:35 am

Nice one…..I think I can be good manager in future :)
5th point need some clerification

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